January 10, 2013

An introduction to Mohona: Estuaries of Desire

Inspirational image from the internet of women in India waiting in line for water.

Inspirational image from the internet of women in India waiting in line for water.

The concept for Mohona: Estuaries of Desire completes our four-year project begun with  Kshoy!/Decay! in 2009. We began working on this project to explore violence experienced by women in global communities of color. We quickly realized that these complex issues needed to be investigated over a longer period of time that would allow us to generate and sustain artistic strategies for anti-violence work.

We have come to understand systemic violence as an intersection of epic, historic violence such as colonialism and slavery; everyday violence resulting from hierarchies of race, class, gender, and sexuality; and violence enacted within and across communities in the name of tradition.

Our quartet of dances since 2009 explores through four paradigms: mud/land(2010 Kshoy!/Decay!),  gold (2011, Tushaanal: Fires of Dry Grass), oil (2012, Moreechika: Season of Mirage), and water (2013, Mohona: Estuaries of Desire). Their stories show how these naturally occurring elements have been harnessed as capital, and have resulted in violence on women.

Inspirational image found on the internet.

Inspirational image found on the internet.

Mohona: Estuaries of Desire is inspired by stories of women and water and the violence that has resulted from the widespread corporatization of this community resource. Working from stories of women’s struggles, pain, determination, and courage around access to water. Mohona becomes a way to remember, imagine, and celebrate their legacies.

Water is material, quenching thirst and a metaphor, signifying flow, femininity, and resistance. Our creative and expressive performing space is imagined as an estuary located at the confluence of multiple marine flows, rich in possibilities, where dancers layer breath, movement, and voice.

As we begin 2013 and deepen the work for Mohona, we invite you to share your stories of water with us on our blog as we take this journey together.

 

 

June 26, 2012

The Deep Reach of Oil Dependence

By Gina Kundan

An image search on the subject of oil offers a compelling story: From happy, healthy babies to sticky, dripping waterfowl, it is abundantly clear that our dependence on oil reaches infinitely further than most of us recognize. Oil cleanses and purifies, it also contaminates and corrupts. Oil is nutritious and healing as much as it pollutes and destroys. Oil is simultaneously ghastly and beautiful. Oil in all of its many forms is essential to our lives and our livelihoods. Oil is a coveted commodity that fuels the economic elite, destabilizes governments, and props up dangerous regimes. We cannot (and will not) survive without oil in all of its many forms, but can we resist greed and corruption? Can we illuminate the ways in which communities continue to resist the environmental devastation and genocide that is so inextricably linked to the collection and distribution of oil?

Our newest work: Moreechika, season of mirage, is in many ways an attempt to wrestle with the environmental, societal, and political implications of our oil dependence. Through artistic metaphor, we use our Contemporary Dance medium to reach beyond the logical/cognitive awareness of facts and explore the ways in which unregulated oil drilling has resulted in wide-spread devastation and has sparked resistance in global communities. We find inspiration in stories of Nigerian activists who’s resistance to “Big Oil” attracted global attention; stories of the indigenous women of Ecuador, who have refused to permit drilling on their land for over 20 years; stories of native Colombian women who have repeatedly forced oil companies out of their lands; and of recent industrial oil spills that have destroyed many ecological systems, communities, and livelihoods.

 

January 24, 2012

Texaco Recipe

I was inside, cooking a meal with my daughter and we heard the younger children’s shouts as they played in the waters after their baths splashing in it, swimming in it, drinking it. We all thought it was water until that day.

As I cooked in silence the children’s voices mixed with the hiss of my stove “Look! There is a rainbow in the water!” hisssssss. Such words sound beautiful at first. Like words in a lullaby. I thought, it is possible a rainbow has appeared in the sky and is so strong that they can see the rainbow’s reflection in the Aguarico.

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